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Ms. Marvel #16

by Because Speed Force on March 15, 2017

Writer: G. Willow Wilson

Artist: Takeshi Miyazawa

Colorist: Ian Herring

Publisher: Marvel Comics

 

 

Ever since Kamala Khan debuted as Ms. Marvel back in 2014, she has been one of the bright spots of Marvel's entire repertoire. Like Peter Parker before her (before he became a multi-billion dollar CEO), Kamala's life is very down to earth and pretty much anyone reading the book can relate to her. Toss in a kooky and loveable personality, and you have a winner on your hands.

 

This current arc with the Doc X virus has many real world implications as it tackles the subject of cyber bullies. With the villain of the arc threatening to dox everyone in Kamala's life unless Kamala steals information from SHIELD, you have a situation that you can pretty read in any newspaper (minus the stealing from SHIELD part). Cyber crime is a huge part of everyday life now, and having an arc devoted to that hits close to home for many of us.

 

Miyazawa's art is, as usual, incredible in this issue. The thing I like best from the art style is that the characters always look like they're in motion and just a little bit “squishy.” For a character with Ms. Marvel's powers, it fits perfectly. Kamala's reactions are also depicted very well, with a quirkiness in the facial expression that perfectly matches Kamala's personality. Perhaps the one aspect I like best about Miyazawa's style is muted color scheme. You'll find no bright and loud colors here; this is Jersey City! Everything looks muted and grungy; basically everything looks dirty. For a street level character like Kamala, it works wonderfully.

 

I can't wait to see how the Damage Per Second arc wraps up next issue and hope that the ultimate payoff is as good as the rest of this storyline has been. It's fun to watch Ms. Marvel take to The Inventor and run around with her Champions buddies, but there's something about watching her tackle an internet bully that is extremely satisfying.

Our Score:

9/10

A Look Inside